Did Christie’s “New Jersey Comeback” Ever Occur – Outside of His Mind?


New Jersey lost 11600 private sector jobs and added 3000 public positions in March. That is the opposite of the image Christie has been bragging about ad nauseam at every town-hall meeting and radio show since January this year. The March figures, even though reflecting a single month, are egg on his face.

Loss of 8,600 NJ jobs clouds economic picture : page all – NorthJersey.com.

Christie’s office referred questions on the job figures to New Jersey’s top economist at the Treasury Department, Charles Steindel, who admitted that there is a definite correlation between between employment and revenue. He did not say it but there are other correlations – sometimes I wonder if they understand them – such as that of employment and economic growth and with aggregate demand. Some are functions of the others.

Steindel said it is a long term relationship, and one month of bad job figures is not enough to redraw the state’s budgeting plan. Again, I must add, one month of good figures is no reason to open the champagne either.

“Data is volatile from month to month, it jumps up and down,” Steindel went on. “I think it’s a little hard to pin too much on the fact that you had a month where things seemed to go in the opposite direction.”

Mr. Steindel is assuming that the natural direction is forward. But there is no natural direction. The economy will move according to a given set of conditions. Those conditions, in New Jersey, do not favor growth. Steindel’s sentence should be corrected and say that we really do not know where the state economy is heading and should include the word stagnation. 

Although an economic failure of the Christie administration would facilitate my election, I do wish the New Jersey economy to improve. The problem is that I do not see real basis for optimism on such an expansion: Not with the current tax and government structures in New Jersey.

The stubbornly high unemployment rate – remains at 9% – betrays the governor’s portrayal of the state under his stewardship as an example of how to rebound the economy.

Christie is a lawyer who has decided to micromanage both education and the economy in New Jersey: That is a recipe for disaster because he is not qualified to do either. But he is not alone. Democrats are not far behind. In fact, he could not do many of the things he is doing without the complicity of at least some of the democrats in the NJ Legislature.

The loss of jobs is always deplorable. Even more deplorable is the rigidity and selfishness of the two political parties which rather see the state decay that give up their power and perks. We are governed by leeches. Significant structural changes in government and the tax system are desperately needed.

My entire economic revival program rests on the premise of increasing aggregate demand in New Jersey. Demand generates supply and increasing supply creates both jobs and wealth.

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